History



The following inscription accompanies the AES symbol

After the cholera epidemics in London in the mid-19th century, when JOHN SNOW first incriminated the water supply in the spread of the disease, a system of iron water-pipes rapidly replaced the old wooden pipes (actually hollow tree-trunks) which had carried London’s drinking water since the Middle Ages. A few of these were preserved, and from one which had been laid in the time of Shakespeare and Elizabeth I and which was in use when the Pilgrim Fathers sailed from America this section was taken and presented in 1967 by THE WELLCOME HISTORICAL MEDICAL MUSEUM, of London, England, to the American Epidemiological Society as a historic symbol of the Society’s scientific and social purpose.

Emerson H. The story of the American Epidemiological Society. Presented at the 28th annual meeting of the American Epidemiological Society, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, April 13, 1951.

Godfrey E.S. As I recall it – the background and beginning of the American Epidemiological Society. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Epidemiological Society, Pittsburgh, PA, April 1952.

Paul O. The last twenty-five years of the American Epidemiological Society: 1972-1996. Am J Epidemiol 1998; 148:104-30.

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    The mission of the American Epidemiological Society is to provide a scientific forum for senior epidemiologists. The AES membership will use this forum to hone its professional expertise and skills through lively interchange of ideas with peers.

    London’s drinking water since the Middle Ages



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